Mr John Douglas

Tribal Warfare

Tag: Horror

Strangler of the Swamp (1946)

Posted on January 29, 2017  in Entertainment, Videos


Strangler of the Swamp (1946) by MargaliMorwentari

 

Strangler of the Swamp is a 1946 American horror film, produced and distributed by Producers Releasing Corporation. It was written and directed by Frank Wisbar, and stars Rosemary LaPlanche, Robert Barrat and Blake Edwards. It is a remake of Wisbar’s earlier German film Fährmann Maria (1936)

 

 

Written and directed by Frank Wisbar, this hour-long B thriller from 1946 is so obscure that it doesn’t even rank an entry in Leonard Maltin’s Movie & Video Guide, but it’s a perfectly adequate example of the low-budget fare that was cranked out like sausages by Producer’s Releasing Corporation (PRC) in post-World War II Hollywood. Of interest to trivia buffs is the youthful appearance of future Pink Panther director Blake Edwards as the movie’s youthful would-be hero, while Rosemary La Planche plays his beloved, who would sacrifice herself to spare her lover from the title character–the shadowy ghost of a ferryman (played by Charles Middleton) who haunts the local swampland, avenging his wrongful hanging for murder. Steeped in rich, foggy atmosphere, the film copies the effective visual style of Wisbar’s earlier German film Fährmann Maria, and although this shoestring spooker barely registers on the fright meter, it’s still an interesting oddity for hardcore film buffs, who will appreciate the fact that a movie of such minimal consequence has somehow made its way to DVD.

 

Strangler Of The Swamp

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Tag: Horror

9 Underrated Horror Movies You Need To Watch Right Now

Posted on August 22, 2016  in Entertainment, Videos

9 (More) Underrated Horror Movies You Need To Watch Right Now

You may call yourself a horror fan, but there are times when a flick so inventive and enjoyable slithers across the screen it leaves you thinking, How have I not seen this before? These are nine of those underrated horror movies, to be watched as soon as possible.


1. Lovely Molly (above)

Female lead starts to lose her mind while spending the duration of the reel in little to no clothing. Sound familiar? Well, think again. Yes, Gretchen Lodge, who stars as Molly, a newlywed who sees a demon creature more than she does her new hubbie, spends much of the film completely nude. However, Eduardo Sanchez’s supernatural creep show is more than skin deep; it’s an attempt at reinvigorating the found-footage subgenre. And for better or worse, it’s bone rattling.

Stream it on Amazon, Google Play, and iTunes.

 

 

2. Coherence

underrated horror movies coherence

Still from Coherence via Ugly Duckling Films

Highly acclaimed by critics yet pretty much universally unseen by the general pubic, Coherence is a crazy-compelling psychological thriller whose weird-out factor is through the roof. Similar to Karyn Kusama’s recent breakout hit, The Invitation, this puzzle of a picture is also centered around a dinner party that goes awry. Only this time, it’s the universe that’s responsible for the evening’s troubling chain of events. Sci-fi fiends, this one’s for you.

 

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Tag: Horror

10 Scary Documentaries You Need To Watch

Posted on August 1, 2016  in Entertainment, Videos

1. “The Nightmare” (2015)

Rodney Ascher’s terrifying film explores the topic of sleep paralysis, and the twisted inner workings of the human brain.

 

2. “There’s Something Wrong with Aunt Diane” (2011)

HBODocs From the title, we obviously know that there’s something wrong with Aunt Diane, but you don’t know the depths of it. The film is compelling throughout it’s entirety, profiling a woman who seems to have things together, as she’s happily married with kids, but then you recognize there’s something very troubling about her.

 

3. “Boy Interrupted” (2009)

Filmmaker Dana Perry profiles her son Evan, who had a fascination with death and dying at a young age. He went through therapy throughout his youth as he struggled with depression and mental illness. Boy Interrupted is a heavy watch, especially when you see Evan’s downward decline, but it highlights the seriousness of mental illness.

 

4. “Never Sleep Again: The Elm Street Legacy” (2014)

Freddy Krueger has probably been the star of your nightmares before. Explore the origins of the terrifying “dream demon” in this award-winning documentary.

 

5. “My Amityville Horror” (2013)

Daniel Lutz tells his version of the notorious Amityville haunting at his Ocean Avenue home where Ronald DeFeo Jr. once slaughtered his sleeping family.

 

6. “Paradise Lost” (2009)

Berlinger and Sinofsky’s documentary profiles the triple murder of three children in West Memphis, Arkansas. The film follows the families of the victims and the accused throughout the trial, and centers on the small-town criminal justice system.

 

 

7. “The Imposter” (2012)

Thirteen-year-old Nicholas Barclay goes missing in 1994, and three years later is found alone and scared in Spain. However, it becomes clear to the family that the boy who went missing is not who he says he is, and is literally an imposter to the family. This chilling documentary will send shivers down your spine from beginning to end!

 

8. “Killer Legends” (2014)

Urban legends make for great horror stories, but how much of them are fiction? Filmmakers Joshua Zeman and Rachel Mills attempt to uncover the truth behind the urban legends we’ve grown to be fearful of.

 

9. “Room 237” (2012)

This documentary explores one of the greatest horror movies of all time, The Shining. It’s an intricate look into fan interpretations of it and its twisted theories.

 

10. “Dear Zachary: A Letter to a Son About His Father” (2008)

This one may pull at your heartstrings a bit. Dear Zachary follows filmmaker Kurt Kuenne’s tribute to his murdered best friend, Andrew Bagby, who was killed in cold blood by his estranged girlfriend, Shirley Turner. In a shocking turn of events, Turner announces that she is pregnant with Bagby’s child. The film is an expose of the custody case, and an emotional letter to his son, Zachary.

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Tag: Horror

Stephen King’s ‘The Mist’ TV Series Heading to Spike

Posted on February 26, 2016  in Entertainment, Uncategorized, Videos

themistbanner-620x400

 

Back in September, it was announced that Stephen King’s The Mist was going to head to television for a series. At that time, all we knew was that the show would be adapted by Christian Torpe, who wrote the successful Danish show “Rita” and that King himself gave his blessings. But that’s all we knew.

 

Now, news has come via Deadline that Spike has give the pilot order for the series from Dimension Television, marking the first Spike scripted dramatic series since the company changed their network approach. Additionally, Torpe has been bumped up to executive producer.

 

Spike Executive Vice President of Original Series Sharon Levy states, “We are thrilled to join forces with the incredibly creative Christian Torpe and Dimension Films to develop Stephen King’s enthralling novella to a compelling series unlike anything else on television.

 

As you all know, I absolutely love The Mist. I think it’s one of the finest horror films of the 2000’s as it mixes the terror of the unknown with the horror of humanity at its worst. It’s a shining example of all that horror has to offer, including a fair bit of gore for all you bloodhounds! Plus, the story’s influence on the Silent Hill franchise can’t be ignore and you all know how obsessed I am with those games!

 

The nature of the the original story and the film definitely allows it to lend itself towards a TV series. There are more than enough events that take place for each episode to have a focus. Furthermore, a TV series could go beyond the supermarket and into other homes, other businesses, other locations to show new groups of people and what they have to do in order to survive. For all we know, the supermarket story is the tamest and least horrific example of what The Mist has to offer.

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Tag: Horror

A Page of Madness

Posted on June 20, 2015  in Entertainment

A_Page_of_Madness_Still

 

 

A Page of Madness (狂った一頁 Kurutta Ippēji or Kurutta Ichipeiji?) is a silent film by Japanese film director Teinosuke Kinugasa, made in 1926. It was lost for forty-five years until being rediscovered by Kinugasa in his storehouse in 1971.  The film is the product of an avant-garde group of artists in Japan known as the Shinkankaku-ha (or School of New Perceptions) who tried to overcome naturalistic representation.

 

Yasunari Kawabata, who would win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1968, was credited on the film with the original story. He is often cited as the film’s screenwriter, and a version of the scenario is printed in his complete works, but the scenario is now considered a collaboration between Kawabata, Kinugasa, Banko Sawada, and Minoru Inuzuka.

 

The film takes place in an asylum. Although cut together in an ever maddening maelstrom, the film loosely tells the story of the janitor of the asylum. His wife is one of the patients. One day their daughter shows up at the asylum to tell her mother about her engagement. This sets off a number of subplots and flashbacks which stitch together the family history (for instance, why the mother is a patient and why the daughter is unaware of her father’s job as a janitor).

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Tag: Horror

The Story of Edward Mordrake, fact or fiction?

Posted on December 8, 2014  in Writing

The face whispered to him at night.

The face whispered to him at night.

 

“The true tale of Edward Mordake (Mordrake) has been lost to history. His unusual case occurred early in medical history and is referenced only in tales handed down. Indeed, the tale of his life has become so muddled through the passage of time that no solid date of birth or death is evident to modern researchers.

 

The story always begins the same way. Edward is said be have been heir to one of the noblest families in England. He was considered a bright and charming man – a scholar, a musician and a young man in possession of profound grace. He was said to be quite handsome when viewed from the front – yet, on the back of his head there was a second face, twisted and evil.

 

In some versions of the story, the second face of Edward is a beautiful girl. This is an impossibility as all parasitic twins are of the same sex. Often it was said that it possessed its own intelligence and was quite malignant in its intentions. It has been said that the eyes would follow spectators and its lips would ‘gibber’ relentlessly and silently. According to legend it would smile and sneer as Edward wept over his condition. While no voice was ever audible, Edward swore that often he would be kept awake by the hateful whispers of his ‘evil twin’. 

 

The story has always concluded with young Edward committing suicide at the age of twenty-three. The method of his death also differs, sometimes poison does him in and in other versions a bullet ‘between the eyes of his devil-twin’ puts him out of his misery. In both versions Edward leaves behind a letter requesting that the ‘demon face’ be destroyed before his burial, ‘lest it continues its dreadful whisperings in my grave.’

 

Is the story of Edward true?  

 

The 1896 text Anomolies and Curiosities of Medicine mentions a version of the story and Edward has been featured in many texts, plays and even music as the Tom Waits song ‘Poor Edward’ is based on the story. However, the tale was considered false for quite some time. It was simply too fantastic to believe and, obviously, many parts of the story simply do not make medical sense – years of retelling warped what was likely a very real occurrence.

 

How can one make the assumption that there is fact beneath this tale?

 

Chang Tzu Ping was discovered in China in the late 70’s or early 80’s. In his 40’s, Chang had been born with a second face consisting of a mouth, a malformed tongue, several teeth, a patch of scalp, and the vestige of other facial constructs. The throat and the lips of the second face could not move independently, but the mouth did reacted in tandem to Chang opening his. 

 

Shortly after being discovered he was brought to the United States to have the second face surgically removed. The entire case was documented – including the surgery – on the 80’s television program ‘That’s Incredible’ – and yet there exists almost no secondary evidence of his existence. The operation was considered successful and Chang likely went home to his village to live the remainder of his life without his ‘devil face’.

 

It does not require a great leap of faith to conclude that the tale of Edward is based on some nugget of fact, perhaps he had something similar Chang’s condition – mutated by storytellers over time. Consider that the case of Chang Tzu Ping is relatively unknown despite only occurring a few decades ago or the strange tale of The Boy of Bengal. These are indeed very rare cases and the human mind has a tendency to classify the unusual as impossible – it often helps us sleep well at night.

 

A comparison.

 

Listen to the Tom Wait song inspired by Edward Mordrake.

 

See a brief video of Chang Tzu Ping here.

 

 

Source: The Human Marvels

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Tag: Horror

Late Night Movie: A Tale Of Two Sisters

Posted on November 12, 2014  in Entertainment

 

A family is haunted by the tragedies of deaths within the family.  Two sisters who, after spending time in a mental institution, return to the home of their father and cruel stepmother. Once there, in addition to dealing with their stepmother’s obsessive and unbalanced ways, an interfering ghost also affects their recovery.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0365376/

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